Eating is now deemed as a social activity. I mean, what’s one thing we all as individuals have in common??

WE ALL LOVE FOOD!

The internet is full of food! Thanks to social media, in particular Instagram there are now a collection of ‘foodie bloggers’ and it’s completely changing the way we eat. Food trends have become more and more focused on what’s ‘Instagrammable’. The #foodporn is trending massively, with over 185million posts on Instagram using the hashtag.

Instagram has changed the way we eat!

People will stop at nothing to get a good photograph of their dinner! Even if it doesn’t taste nice, at least the world will be jealous. This ‘food porn’ sometimes depends on people paying ridiculously high prices for a very basic product which only looks appealing due to its whacky appeal. Dirty Bones, a restaurant in London: offers a free “foodie Instagram pack” that comes with a camera light, wide lens, phone charger, and a tripod selfie stick so that diners make the most of taking photographs for their social media.

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT!
WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU WENT TO A RESTAURANT AND DIDN’T SEE A SINGLE PERSON TAKING PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE FOOD? (Feel free to have discussions in the comments below)

It may be suggested that most ‘food porn’ is considered unhealthy because what’s appealing about a plate of vegetables?

Although, trending now on social media is the promotion of healthy living. Bloggers feel good about themselves after posting the porridge and fruit they had for breakfast online. You may be posting food to show people that you are eating mindfully and consuming healthy meals. These posts could influence others to do the same and promote the importance of healthy living. Thus, suggesting social media helps motivate others to eat healthy and lead a healthy lifestyle. Models will pose with their perfect bodies ensuring others they can too look this way if they follow their diet raceme. Additionally, social media may be seen as a positive scheme to help encourage healthy living. As in the UK alone obseity is on the rise.

There’s a correlation between people’s popularity on social media and their appearances, so people are often presenting themselves in the best way possible which is not always a true reflection of how a person actually looks/feels about themselves. Following models, celebrities and fitness accounts. Their profiles, for the most part, give the world a skewed view of what an average body looks like. It’s hard not to look at models body’s on Instagram and begin to shame your own.

WHAT IS CLASSED AS AN EATING DISORDER?

Signs & Symptoms of an Eating Disorder
A man or woman suffering from an eating disorder may reveal several signs and symptoms, some may include:
• Chronic dieting despite being hazardously underweight
• Constant weight fluctuations
• Obsession with calories and fat contents of food
• Engaging in ritualistic eating patterns, such as cutting food into tiny pieces, eating alone, and/or hiding food
• Continued fixation with food, recipes, or cooking; the individual may cook intricate meals for others but refrain from eating
• Avoidance of social functions, family, and friends. May become isolated and withdrawn
• Switching between periods of overeating and fasting


Take time to watch this video if you are unsure on any symptoms!

SO HOW DOES THE USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA AFFECT EATING DISORDERS?

All eating disorders are rooted in the desire to exert control over one’s body in order to look “perfect.”
Today’s society, are highly attached to social cues and may be vulnerable to peer pressure. Individuals are increasingly getting the message through social media that they’re not the right size or shape, both passively and interactively. Simply being on social media can invite harsh and hurtful comments. Fat shaming celebrities or even regular users has been trending rapidly on platforms like twitter. This may put pressure on people to question their own image due to these trolls.

These videos all discuss the negatives social cues have on body image, thus, leading one to develop an eating disorder.

Some research believe that the media has nothing to do with the development of eating disorders, but how can that be true?  With the desire to be thin in every direction and now at almost every age, it is almost like if you aren’t thin, you are an outcast.  Any thoughts?

Here are a few tips to minimize your risk of social media leading to an eating disorder:
• Be mindful of whom you follow. It can be motivating to follow food and fitness blogs and pages, but make sure you follow the right ones. Follow ones that promote positive information that makes you feel good about who you are.
• Don’t be afraid to unfollow. If you find yourself becoming overwhelmed because you can’t live up to the expectations of others on social media, unfollow those people or pages. Don’t be afraid to unfollow those that aren’t good for your physical or mental health.